Information of Health Topics

Aromatherapy Essential Oils – An Inheritance Well Acclaimed


The use of essential oils, which is derived from the pure essence of a plant, is not new. Though the term aromatherapy was coined only in the 1920s (by Gattefossé in 1928), people knew of aromatherapy essential oils from the prehistoric times. Starting from the Chinese to Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Persian and Indian civilizations, each have added to the science of essential oils and to aromatherapy as a whole. [Read more →]

March 2, 2015   by  admin

Symptoms Rheumatoid Arthritis & Foods Help Preventing


I did a lot of searching online, and it was clear that there is plenty of related information, but there is little directly about symptoms rheumatoid arthritis. I hope the following will be interesting to you. [Read more →]

March 2, 2015   by  admin

Arthritis and Chronic Joint Symptoms


From the Centers for Disease Control

Are you female, Caucasian, have a lesser education, and overweight? Then you run the greatest risk of either arthritis or chronic joint symptoms. Check out the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). [Read more →]

March 2, 2015   by  admin

Free Radicals: Destructive Scavengers and the Vital Role Antioxidants Play


Several years ago, it was all over the news. Free radicals were damaging – we all had them, and antioxidants were the solution. But what role really do free radicals play in damaging the body, and how are we supposed to best get rid of them? How do antioxidants work and what is the best way of adding them to our diet? [Read more →]

March 2, 2015   by  admin

How To Use Aromatherapy Candles To Create A Welcoming Atmosphere!


Burning aromatherapy candles scented with pure essential oils is a wonderful way to add fragrance to a room. Not only does an aromatherapy candle smell nice, it can have therapeutic effects on the body and mind. Essential oils are extracted from certain aromatic plants and are used by aromatherapists to promote emotional and physical well being. When a few drops of a particular plant essence is added to a candle, its powerful aroma molecules are diffused into the surrounding air as the wax melts. When inhaled, the fragrance can help soothe and revitalize. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin

Frankincense In Aromatherapy – Trees, Tears And Essential Oils


The Mysterious Frankincense

Used for many thousands of years, the Frankincense tree has perhaps the greatest association with spiritual practice of any plant on earth. In most of the great ancient cultures, including the Egyptian, Babylonian, Persian, Hebrew, Greek and Roman civilizations, it has played a role in religious and domestic life. Frankincense has been sought after by kings and valued as highly as gold. More recently, the essential oil is gaining popularity with spiritual seekers and natural healers alike. What is so special about this tree that its ‘pearls’ were given as a gift at the birth of one of history’s most revered prophets?

The Hardy Tree and its Tears

The Frankincense tree, or Olibanum, upon first glance, may seem rather unremarkable. It appears as a giant shrub, with many knurled branches topped with abundant slender leaves and occasionally, small white flowers. A native to northern Africa, it looks like it belongs in the desert, growing in some of the world’s harshest conditions. But it is not the tree itself, but rather its sap that has such profound lore surrounding it. When the tree’s bark is pierced with a knife (known traditionally as a ‘Mingaf’), a milky-white oleoresin is exuded – thought the tree is not harmed. The resin forms droplets known as ‘tears’ or ‘pearls’, which harden into the orange-brown gum known itself as Frankincense. The English name of this natural incense is derived from the medieval French ‘franc’, meaning ‘pure’ or ‘free’, and from the Latin ‘incensium’, meaning ‘to smoke’.

History’s Most Popular Incense

For more than 5000 years, the hardened resin has been burned in temples throughout Egypt, China and India; the Catholic church continues to use it today during Mass. It is one of the four main ingredients in Jewish ceremonial incense, forming an important part of the Sabbath day offerings. The smoke of Frankincense (as with other ritual incense) is thought to carry prayers to heaven upon it’s smoke. It is also said to deepen the breath and still the mind, making it useful for meditation and yogic practice. The incense may have health benefits as well, producing a highly antiseptic smoke, keeping churches and churchgoers free from disease.

According to ancient documents, the great Baal temple of Babylon consumed 2 and a half tons of Frankincense a year. The Frankincense trade was of immense importance in ancient times, peaking about 2000 years ago. Caravans grew to as many as 2 to 3 thousand camels in size. Cities grew up along the trade routes, and heavy taxes and fees for protection, lodging and camel fodder raised the cost of the resin considerably, so much so that it was valued as much as gold. The wealth involved inspired Alexander the Great to plot to control the region, though his death happened to preceed the invasion.

Health Benefits

Frankincense resin is thought to have a bounty of health properties – it was an ingredient in a rejuvenate face mask in ancient Egypt (it was also charred and used as the classic heavy eyeliner seen in much ancient Egyptian art), and at one time was “used to treat every conceivable ill to man”. In ayurvedic medicine it is known as salai guggul, used for centuries to treat many conditions, including arthritis. Modern science has isolated the active compounds found to have anti-arthritic properties. Called boswellic acids, these components inhibit the inflammatory process, improve blood supply and prevent further cartilage reduction.

Frankincense Essential Oil

Modern natural medicine has taken to the use of the essential oil of Frankincense. The oil, having a warm, woody, sweet aroma with a hint of citrus, is steam or CO2 distilled from the resin. It is used for respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, catarrh and asthma; for wrinkles, wounds and dry skin, and in cases of rheumatism, cystitis and leukorrea.

The most important effect of the essential oil may be on the nervous system. Regarded as an antidepressant, the aroma can both relax and revitalize, and can help in cases of nervous tension and exhaustion. Frankincense oil contains sesquiterpenes, which stimulate the limbic system, the hypothalamus, the pineal and the pituitary glands. The oil is now being researched for it’s ability to increase human growth hormone production. Further, it is considered to strengthen the immune system, which may in-fact occur as a result of it’s uplifting properties.

Frankincense essential oil can be used in a manner similar to burning of the incense in spiritual practice. Warming in a candle lamp or direct application to the temples and third eye will quiet the mind, deepen the breath, and promote meditative stillness. It is often blended with Sandalwood, Myrrh and Cedarwood for such uses, and the single-pointed concentration it invokes is thought to allow the spirit to soar.

Experimenting with Frankincense

Frankincense resin is widely available at reasonable costs. Most is wildcrafted, being extracted from trees growing in the deserts of northeast Africa – thankfully, the resource is abundant, as the trees easily survive harvesting of the pearls. The small chunks of resin can simply be lit by themselves in a dish or similar container, and allowed to smolder and release their smoke. Frankincense is also available in prepared incense sticks and other incense preparations. In the form of your choosing, simply light and allow some quiet time to experience the deep aroma. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin

Sandalwood Oil – Aromatherapy For The Mind, Body, And Spirit


Sandalwood is one of the world’s most widely used essential oils, prized for its scent in perfumery, for its therapeutic effects in Chinese, Ayurvedic and Tibetan medicine systems, and for its ability to center the mind in meditative yogic traditions. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin

Allergy and Mental Disease


The following will come as a surprise to most people, including most medical doctors.

Most mental disease is caused by unsuspected brain allergies!

This fact was illuminated for me by Dr Marshall Mandell in the early 80′s. He appeared on the Phil Donahue show, and had videos of persons with mental problems caused or worsened by allergen testing. He was the first to name such as “brain allergies”. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin

How to prevent your nasal allergy?


Do you know why and how your nose could feel itching and sensitive? The substance that causes itching and sensitive of your nose is called allergen. These include pollen, mold, dust mites, certain foods, latex, animal dander, and others. These allergens sensitize the nasal mucosal membrane through a sensitization process, which typically involves a few types of cell in our body, such as macrophage, lymphocyte and mast cell. In the beginning of the sensitization, allergens penetrate through the mucosal surface in our nasal passage. The easiness of the allergens penetrate through the mucosal surface is due to the deficiency of IgA antibodies, which main function is eliminating micro organisms that adhere to the mucosal surface. Usually, patients, who allergic to the allergen, have lower level of IgA antibodies. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin

Do You Know These Common Allergy Symptoms?


You known you’re allergic when you react to certain substances you’ve been exposed to before. For instance, you may have eaten shellfish before but the next time you eat foods containing shellfish, you develop rashes.

An allergy occurs when your body overreacts to things that don’t normally cause problems for most people. These things are called allergens and your body’s overreaction to them are what causes allergy symptoms. [Read more →]

February 28, 2015   by  admin